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Alex

Qualcomm acquires webOS, iPAQ patents from HP

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Here's a new story this week....looks like Qualcomm acquired webOS patents from HP. LG bought webOS and all the source code but licensed the patents from HP. I wonder what this means for LG now and what Qualcomm plans to do. LG uses Qualcomm processors in their phones...we can speculate!

 

http://www.qualcomm.com/snapdragon/smartphones/lg-optimus-g

 

Source: http://liliputing.com/2014/01/qualcomm-acquires-webos-ipaq-patents-from-hp.html

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