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Reading exFAT formatted USB storage devices

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Yesterday, I connected my 2 TB external HDD formatted as exFAT to my 55" webOS TV to realise that it was not reading - turns out that the TV does not support exFAT. 

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Most devices support FAT32 and exFAT as the major OSes( Windows,Linux,MacOSX) support them  almost as their native filesystem. Its strange to see LG TV support a proprietary and which is badly/not fully supported on all OSes: NTFS. This filesystem  (NTFS) should be the last to support on any other device thats not a Windows machine.

 My problem: I use a macos and can not write on NTFS devices. If I wish to view a 4K movie (64GB) , I have to pay an additional 20-30$ for a software that allows my mac to write/format NTFS files to a usb stick. The free-open-source software ntfs-3g its not good enough because it takes about 3hours to write a 4k movie (64GB) on a USB3.0 (UltraFit).

Great TV LG, but thanks a lot (sarcastically) for  taking from me more money and time to write my wedding on a USB3.0 so that I can view it on the TV.

 

 

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I too came here because I wan't to access some large file on a USB drive from my LG WebOS TV, and I use Mac so I can't use NTFS.
But I must clear up some misunderstandings:

exFAT IS NOT STANDARD on most Linux distributions!
Actually it dosen't even have a kernel module (only Fuse userland module) because exFAT is a licensed, close source and closed protocol.
It's not difficult to find this information, just look at wikipedia:
"exFAT (Extended File Allocation Table) is a Microsoft file system introduced in 2006 optimized for flash memory such as USB flash drives and SD cards.[5] It is proprietary and Microsoft owns patents on several elements of its design"

It was meant to replace FAT32 because of the filesize limitations. NTFS was doomed not feasible for small removable devices. But the biggest problem with NTFS is actually that it is closed source and support in other OS'es than windows is either made by:
a. buying and signing an NDA with Microsoft or
b. reversed engineered. Which is the solution Linux and Mac has chosen, and the reason Mac (and earlier Linux) defaulted to mount readonly. They didn't want to risk destroying anything.

So while I do agree with Microsoft that we need a new filesystem. I don't think a proprietary filesystem is the solution, for storage that is meant to be used in a lot of different devices based on different OS'es.

Could it be a solution to split the MKV's to multipart? I haven't tried but maybe WebOS will play them seamlessly.

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