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Elia Bisconti

Facebook and all Italian streaming app [MEDIASET/LA7/RAI REPLAY]

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All this ^ apps don't work on my 32LF630V (updated)


xkè la tv nn è ufficiale Italia, ma Europa e quindi i servizi e le app che hai citato, come anche premium play x esempio, non si aprono

Inviato dal mio E6853 utilizzando Tapatalk

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