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Alex

Bring back the Pre 3!!!

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If I had to wish for someting, it would be the HP Pre 3 but as an LG Pre 4 with even better hardware and 4G LTE!

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Maybe the Pre 4 could be a slab with a slide out horizontal keyboard like the first Motorola Droid...

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There are many others to mimic - would a future Pre 3/4 be a follower OR leader?

 

 

Good point, its more nostalgia for me... :P  A nice slab phone at this point would be great...anything at this point would be great...

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Good point, its more nostalgia for me... :P  A nice slab phone at this point would be great...anything at this point would be great...

Everyone has a slab phone. The physical keyboards of the WebOS phones set them apart. I wore out my Veer and was looking for something similar. There isn't anything. Everything is a slab phone and they just keep getting bigger. For people who use their phones for work, the go-to apps are e-mail and texting. I need a physical keyboard for that because of the constant errors of virtual ones. I also need a phone that is a comfortable size to carry in my pocket. A 5" screen isn't what I need. The only reason Blackberry is still in business is because HP's CEO's were too dense to realize that is what they were going after. The need is still there. There is even less competition. Motorola used to have 'Pro' versions of their Android phones with keyboards, but no longer. Why not go after the niche market that wants a smaller phone with a physical keyboard? Why not target Blackberry? Why not just usurp Hurd's WebOS strategy, since HP could no longer understand it once he left?

WebOS phones weren't the strategy with WebOS, Synergy was. The corporate market was the target. HP had WebOS running on phones, tablets, laptops, desktops, and printers. By using Synergy to simplify corporate phone and computer configurations, HP planned on selling a lot of computers, phones, tablets, and most importantly, Synergy servers and services.

This message took twice as long to type on a tablet with a virtual keyboard than it would have taken on my Veer.

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I did like my pre 2. Never got a pre 3... But my 2 served very well and I liked the keyboard. Used a pixi for a while with that keyboard as well. I agree that differentiating would be the way to go.

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