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NewsDummy

PreCentral: The Waiting Game

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The Waiting Game

In this year of two thousand twelve, we've reached a point in our modern society where waiting is considered a bad thing. Patience runs thin. We don't tolerate lines, nor are we accepting of slow downloads. We get irritated if we have to wait for what we perceive as being too long for food in a restaurant, the arrival of a delivery, or for that idiot driver up ahead to make up their mind about how fast they're going to drive.

All of this makes being a webOS fan an excruciating exercise in patience. It's one thing to be waiting for a device to be released after its announced. You have a general idea of when it's going to come, even if it's something vague like "first half of 2011" or "late summer". You have a time frame. Right now, as we wait on whatever's happening with Open webOS to, well, happen, we have no time frame. At least with the open sourcing process for webOS we had a roadmap. Now that the roadmap was more-or-less fully executed upon at the end of September, we've ended up in a holding pattern here in the webOS community, waiting for something - anything - to come our way.

Three months ago we broke the news about HP spinning off the webOS Global Business Unit as a sort-of-independent company to be called Gram. Two months ago they moved out of the old Palm campus into a newly renovated space. And today the company still hasn't been announced, let alone discussed what they're going to do. For three months now, employees have been stuck in this sort of limbo where they can say they work for Gram, wear Gram shirts, and carry around Gram bags, but can't talk about what Gram is going to do.

So we wait for Gram to become official. And we wait for the webOS-powered LG TV (maybe - maybe - seeing a debut at CES this coming January) and for webOS Professional Edition and for the Android Compatibility Layer and for… anything.

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