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Susan Howdyshell

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    • By Sandip Prajapati
      Hello,
      I am using LG  OLED 55" TV since its launch new in the Market. I want education application like Udemy, Pluralsight, Linux Academy, Coursera, in the LG Content Store. 
      These education apps are widely used very in all Android and IOS platform. but LG OLED we unable to add the these app until LG can make it available to customer. 
      I had made the two times request in the past but nothing and no one addressed the issue and not received any response yet.
       
      I request you, please address the issue and make education available to LG content store.
       
      Thanks.
      Regards,
      Sandip Prajapati
       
       
    • By Alex
      Here' s the latest video from LG on webOS Auto. An excellent introduction to LG's webOS Auto, a  Linux-powered Automotive OS Platform.
       

    • By News Reporter
      When you're HP, you've got money to play around with. Sure, you're not making a much money as you used to, but there's still cash sitting around with which you can do things. You
      link hidden, please login to view, and you can plunk down half a million dollars to become a Platinum member of the . That cool $500,000 was enough to lift HP out of their previous Gold level membership, lofting the Palo Alto company to the ranks of Fujitsu, , , NEC, , , and . Making this investment also gives HP a seat on the Linux Foundation Board of Directors, giving them a direct voice in how they want to see Linux evolve in all sorts of manners, especially with respect to HP's own businesses.
      While was not explicitly (or implicitly) mentioned in the press release announcing HP's ascension to Platinum membership within the Linux Foundation, we can't help but think that this could prove to be a good thing for our favorite mobile operating system. webOS has from its start been based on Linux, and makes use of the . While up to this point HP has taken and integrated Linux code into Open webOS, going forward they'll have the ability to influence how Linux evolves in ways that may be beneficial to Open webOS. Money buys influence, influence gets you what you want.





    • By News Reporter
      Revealed today on the Open webOS GitHub was the next step forward for
      link hidden, please login to view: build instructions to install the operating system on an Ubuntu Linux . The instructions, , go over the steps you'l need to take to download, build, install, and run the open source version of webOS, and the first prerequisite you're going to have to overcome is having an Ubuntu Linux machine. If we had to guess, that's not something the vast majority of you have or have access to.
      But if you do have Ubuntu installed on your computer, then all you need is a good internet connection for 500MB worth of downloads and 4GB of free space on your hard drive to get started, plus the patience to follow along in command prompt and wait for the build process to do its thing. And we know the next question you're ready to ask: no, there are not instructions to install this build of Open webOS on a TouchPad, Pre, or any other mobile device. Or your Mac or PC. We're not apologizing for HP here, but right now. Ubuntu Linux is better than nothing, we suppose, but for an operating system that was built around and for touch interfaces, we're not sure how well that's going to work.
      We're getting set up to install Open webOS ourselves (Derek doesn't have Ubuntu installed either, so don't feel bad), and will update you once we've got things rolling.




    • By News Reporter
      webOS and Android both have something very fundamental in common - they're based off of the Linux open source kernel. Up until the decision to go open source, Palm and then HP used a custom proprietary version of that kernel to power webOS, but with the OS
      link hidden, please login to view over the coming months, HP's changing over to the Linux Standard Kernel instead to open up webOS to the wide world of, well, other devices (). And that brings us to today, when webOS CTO Sam Greenblatt tweeted the following: "All drivers of Android will be included in Linux kernel 3.3 the LSK. Isn't that interesting?"

      Yes, Sam, that is interesting. The merger of Android and Linux kernels with version 3.3 has been going on for a while, but mostly in the circles that are frequented by the uber-techs: the Linux Foundation. They're incorporating a lot of the open source drivers from Android into the open source Linux Standard Kernel, the end goal being to make it easier to install Linux and its derivatives on a wider range of devices.
      So what does this mean for , now that it's poised to adopt the Linux Standard Kernel? It means that it will be easier for end users to install webOS onto a wider range of devices and get greater support for the hardware inside. Of course, there are plenty of things you can expect to not have support even with Android drivers getting rolled into the kernel. For one, the cellular radios in Android smartphones are powered by proprietary drivers from the manufacturer and won't be included in the Linux Standard Kernel.
      Still, it's a big step forward for making it easier to install webOS and other Linux-derived operating systems on a whole universe of Android-powered hardware.
      Source: ; Via:




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