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pivotCE

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pivotCE last won the day on December 24 2017

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  1. It’s been over a year since there was a webOS meet up in Chicago, but it’s happening next month! There are many fun things to do in Schaumburg, but the highlight of your visit will of course be the chance to sit down with fellow webOS enthusiasts to enjoy pizza and good conversation. The 2018 webOS meetup will be on Sunday June 3rd 2018 at 7pm. The place is Moretti’s Ristorante and Pizzeria, 1893 Walden Office Square, Schaumburg, IL 60173. Bring your old webOS devices, your new LuneOS devices and your Raspberry Pi running webOS OSE (but maybe leave your webOS TV at home). Click here for directions to Moretti’s. Any questions? Here’s the forum. The team at pivotCE remind you that if you are planning a meet up, let us know! We are interested in promoting your events (it might even increase attendance!). We are also interested in reports and pictures from webOS events. Related posts: webOS meetup, Chicago, 23rd November webOS meetup, Chicago, 27th November webOS meetup, Chicago, 17th April View the full article
  2. Android Police broke the story earlier today that TCL will launch a Palm branded phone via Verizon sometime in the 2nd quarter this year. And surprise…it runs Android. Sadly that’s all we know for now. It’s taken TCL a long time to do anything with the Palm brand. We first talked about it 3 years ago. It started as an unveil of sorts at CES in 2015 when they announced they had purchased the Palm brand and they’d be crowd-sourcing from “Palm’s very own community” what to do with it. No idea what they meant by that… They even launched a website placeholder that directed palm.com to mynewpalm.com. Both of which are no longer doing anything. But trust me when I say I’ll be hammering the refresh button for the near future on palm.com. Fun fact: This topic was also the fourth to last article written on the now silent webOSNation.com to give you a reference for how long it took TCL to do something! At any rate, I’m glad the wheels are turning and I’ll hold judgement until I see what they release though the carrier exclusivity announcement makes my eye twitch. Even former Palm CEO Jon Rubinstein knew carrier exclusivity aided in the death of webOS and the remnants of Palm. “I think the deal we had with Verizon really hurt us, but who knew that at the time? These things are all hindsight.” TCL can use hindsight for historical evidence though. Hopefully they’re crunching the numbers… #PalmForever Related posts: HP is to Palm as Lenovo is to Motorola…Not Good The Next webOS Phone? (Part I) The Second Day of webOS-mas – Print from your phone View the full article
  3. Dig around in your closet, dump out that side table drawer, and wade through boxes in your garage. Do whatever you have to do to find those old Palm OS devices because there’s a new software archive in town! Reddit user, Yiddish, established the archive and is adding to it via donations from Palm fans. (Check out /r/Palm by the way!) If you have files to add, reach out to Yiddish via the Reddit post or on the twitter page for @ArchivePalmOS. Shalom! #PalmOSforever Click the pic above for a recent /r/Palm post from andymememe. Related posts: Forty Years of Tech Exhibit Showcases first Palm PDA TCL, Blackberry & Palm HP attempts to sell Palm patents – again. View the full article
  4. The release of fresh webOS code from LG in the form of webOS Open Source Edition was unexpected. There’s been some interest in what exactly it is. Fortunately, web developer, Garrett Downs has the Raspberry Pi 3 needed to run the code and we have a guest post with his first impressions: What’s that? Pining for webOS? Build and install on your Raspberry Pi! https://t.co/3Eslofgb1x and https://t.co/GxY3yWnJlz — webOS DevRelations (@webOSdev) March 20, 2018 When I saw a tweet from @webOSdev announcing webOS OSE was available to install on a Raspberry Pi 3, I knew what I’d be doing that night after work. Unfortunately, the process to build it requires hours of time and a computer running Linux natively (virtual machines are not recommended). I didn’t have either of those things. Luckily, someone had already built it and made the image available to download. Sweet! I put the image on a SD card, loaded it into my Pi, and powered it up. After booting, you’re greeted with a nice splash screen with the webOS OSE logo in the corner. The recommended first thing to do is go into settings and connect to ethernet or Wi-Fi, so that’s what I did. That’s actually the only thing you can do in the settings right now. The only other section contains some basic info about the OS and that’s it. Alright, how about apps? As this is the very first version of the project, I wasn’t expecting much here. Pressing F1 on the keyboard triggers the app menu to slide in from the right side of the screen. There are three “apps” in there, but they’re nothing more than website wrappers. ‘Enact’ and ‘webOS OSE’ will bring you to two sites with lots of info about the OSE project and how to get started developing. The third is ‘YouTube’, which is obviously a YouTube app. I haven’t tried signing into my Google account, but videos on the landing page work just as they should. The interface doesn’t have cards like we know them from old webOS or the small tiles of webOS TV. I’m not sure how webOS OSE handles switching between apps. They only really told us how to open the app list. I’m curious to learn more about this. I’d say that this is a pretty barebones OS in its current form. It seems to be the TV OS with a lot of the stuff removed (or just not accessible yet?), like the apps along the bottom of the homescreen, content store, most of the settings, etc. I think it’s enough for developers to start poking around though. I don’t know if it’s touchscreen-enabled, but I would assume so. So, that’s all there is to see for now, at least from an end user’s point of view. If you happen to be an app developer like me, there are already some tools on the webOS OSE site to get started tinkering. I’ve had some limited success getting a couple of my apps up and running. If you’re looking to dig deeper than app dev, the entire project is open source so feel free to dive right in! The documentation for app development seems to be pretty decent considering how new this project is. If you don’t want to bother setting up a Raspberry Pi, I made a short video showing most of what I mentioned above. Related posts: The First Day of webOS-mas – webOS Quick Install Enyo Next-Gen enters private beta testing webOS meetup, Chicago, 17th April View the full article
  5. Yo! We heard you like open sourced webOS so LG open sourced the open source of webOS! Ok, so that’s not entirely accurate since LG purchased the closed source webOS code from HP after they open sourced…well…bits and pieces of it back in 2012. So no, you’re not stuck in a Doctor Strange time loop. webOS has been open sourced before but not by LG. This news comes as a shock to the current legacy webOS community still rocking Pre 3s and waiting for LuneOS to reach “driver” status. The community hasn’t poured through the code as of yet but it immediately begs certain questions: Will the work on LuneOS be helped or hindered by additional LG open source code which LG had already been committing too for some time (though they have missed some of their promised bits for a while)? What hardware limitations are there for use of the software? Still looking for that webOS toaster… How flexible (read: portable) is it? How complete is it? HP’s open source webOS was decidedly incomplete… We’ll keep you updated on the developments on this as they become available. For now, the conversation has started on the forums so feel free to chime in. #webOSforever Related posts: Enyo Team Open Sources Mochi UI, Feels like webOS 3.1 Open webOS Running on a WiFi Router Open Letter to LG #1 View the full article
  6. It’s been quite a while since our last release and we’ve been keeping quiet lately. Some of the team members have also enjoyed some well deserved time off in the meanwhile as well. The majority of what we’ve been working on hasn’t been and isn’t ready for public consumption. But quite a lot of things have happened in the past couple of months. Here’s what we’ve been working on since the previous release: -Updated various underlying OS bits: IM plugins such as SkypeWeb, YahooPlusPlus. -Update from BlueZ4 to BlueZ5. This one is a major upgrade that requires all our targets to have major rework on low level code and this has been taking a long time but is now complete for the Nexus 4 and Nexus 5. This also required us to rework our Settings App plugin for BlueTooth. Since we were never really happy with the plugins and their negative impact on the performance combined with the still uncertain future of the Enyo framework, we decided to start rewriting the Settings app in QML. This will also bring back the individual Settings icons back to the launcher, like they were available on legacy webOS 2.x and 3.x. -Added various bits and initial work for VPN plugin support for ConnMan. -Cleanup various configuration files. -Changed the default wallpaper to a nice new high quality LuneOS one! Thanks to Hans Kokx (aka HaDAk for the great photos!) -Various minor tweaks to configuration. We’ve been working on some new porting targets as well. Seeing that Halium is now available for a large number of target devices (50+ at the time of writing), users/developers have come along wanting to try LuneOS on their Halium supported device too so we’re trying to assist those in getting LuneOS working. This is still a lot of work in progress, but results look promising in general. This also would mean we will support Android 7.1.x based devices and Aarch64 bits architecture (ARM 64 bits chipsets). New targets we are currently developing for are: Xiaomi Redmi Note 4x (mido), OnePlus X (onyx), Google/Huawei Nexus 6P (angler) and Motorola G4 (athene). These are in various stages of development currently. We’ve also been assisting the PostmarketOS guys in getting LuneOS running on their build system and targets with great success so far! There are still bits to be added and polished but it’s already a great start to see how far they have been able to come in such short time! We’re also looking into integrating more with Halium , allowing more and easier ports of the LuneOS! We plan to be back with a new release in due course, in the meanwhile you can always check our our latest nightlies! Related posts: Official Release of LuneOS and Project Updates LuneOS July Stable Release: Cortado LuneOS Update for May View the full article
  7. Have you ever wanted (or needed) to create your own app for webOS? I did. My aim was to create custom apps to launch websites or local html/css/javascript files. Read on for… What I did: Since I knew nothing about Mojo or Enyo, I went looking for a simple template app that I could customize as required using nothing but a text editor and Jason Robitaille’s IpkPackager. But if such a template exists, I couldn’t find it. So I created one. You can get it over at GitHub. Go explore the template app! The template app contains a set of detailed instructions and the files are commented to make them easy to understand. The app also contains instructions for launching local files rather than a website. The idea is to make it as simple as possible to create apps for webOS using regular html, css, and javascript. If the learning curve isn’t as steep, perhaps more users will be able to help themselves. If you make improvements to the template, please fork the repository and contribute! If you have questions or comments, visit the story thread over at webOS Nation. Related posts: 6000+ Apps, Abandonware, and More to Come Preserving webOS apps Skype shutting down 3rd-party apps in December View the full article
  8. If you have Forums and/or Communities for the TouchPad, you’ll notice webOS Nation forums aren’t working. The good news is, there’s a fix for it for Forums. The bad news is there’s no fix for it in Communities…yet. webOS Nation forum user, Fred Zyphal, noted the Forums app wasn’t connecting to the webOS Nations forums anymore and others jumped in to confirm and to test some solutions. It turns out Forums just needs the entry for webOS Nation updated from http to https. So swipe away your old entry for it and add a new one with the “s” after http. Communities seems to be more difficult and a fix is still in work. You can load Forums on your TouchPad if you want but it only shows in the phone emulator view. If Communities can’t be saved it may be possible to format the Forums app to take up the whole screen on the TouchPad though. More to come on that. #webOSforever No related posts. View the full article
  9. KarenIf you’re an active member of the webOS community these days, you’ll know we’re a small, tight-knit group of friendly folks. Our three subgroups tend to be mostly free-time developers, advanced users, and those that are hanging on to the form factor/mobile OS despite its limited services and with little regard for the do-it-all-for-you modern devices. The forums on webOS Nation continue to be the primary source for communication and provide the venue for meeting the occasional “newcomer” to our little slice of the web. This is the story of one such friend of webOS. Meet Karen… …a complete stranger swimming in the sea of internet anonymity like us all. I met Karen via twitter. @alan_morford Found you on WebOSNation. I'm using an original Pre as my primary, have a new Veer that I'd love to get up and running. Way above my paygrade. Can I hire you? Also, lifelong Cubs fan. If that helps — Karen T Madden (@karentmadden) November 13, 2017 To read her full backstory check out her first post on the forums but I’ll summarize: she had 3 Sprint Pres since 2009 which all died slow deaths physically, she bought a Veer with intent to switch to a GSM carrier but the setup steps were a bit daunting, so she reached out to the community for help. You may notice the time gap between her post and the tweet above. The Veer sat in the box for about a year and in the meantime she had been using a semi-crippled Sprint Pre and an unnamed Android device to get through her work and home life. She needed assistance with the Veer and I offered to help. But Karen’s story does not end with sending me the Veer nor is this a tale of getting a webOS user back up and running. What I learned from helping her was two-fold because while Karen is a specific person, she represents something bigger. Karen is “every man”…well, as it relates to the quiet masses of unnamed people out there still using webOS. There are more people still using webOS than we in the community realize. The forum may number in the 100s but there are likely 5-10x that still out there plugging away with that tacky keyboard and brittle slider. These folks will find us eventually on the forums. We must be ready and willing to assist. webOS is still impacting people’s lives in the original ways Palm strived to achieve. Connecting everything via synergy, fast task switching, and everything accessible via a “Just type” search among others. But this only encapsulates the “what” in webOS’ draw. I’ll let Karen tell you the “why” in the words she shared upon receiving the Veer back from me (emphasis added). “I’d been telling myself it’s ‘just a phone’ but…using it today, I know that webOS is so much more for me. I powered [the Veer] this morning and, I just don’t have words. It’s that July day back in 2009, all over again. Except…back then I was meeting a new friend, who, I thought, might help me live my life on my terms. The Pre was the first device I carried ubiquitously. Today, though, flipping through cards, running apps, it’s a long lost friend and partner, returning to my life. I hadn’t realized how it had been slipping away, one function at a time, with the Pre. You never know what you have until you’ve lost it. I can’t even express what this means to me. …I drive so hard in life, and depend on a few tools and people to enable my work. Years ago, when I was playing cello professionally, my daughter broke my cello, [I thought] permanently. It was in the shop for over a month, and while I had an exquisite loaner to use, it wasn’t the cello I had used every day for 25 years. Everything was just a tiny bit….off. Everything […] required extra thought, extra awareness. I finally got my cello back, restored. I didn’t have words then either. This feels exactly the same. Having a phone that is intuitive allows me to focus on the big stuff! I will put it succinctly: webOS is a superlative tool that allows me to focus on work and do great good. My contributions to this world would be diminished without it.” Well said, Karen. webOS itself was quite the contribution to the world. And our little community, however small, still makes a big impact not in the market but in the lives of its users. It’s awesome to give back to those that make our little community great especially during the season of giving. Thanks webOS Nation! #webOSforever Related posts: UPDATE: Special Investigations Unit asks webOS Users for Help in Murder Case LuneOS Is All About Users View the full article
  10. Found my old one!! Just no idea how to get past this palm profile screen without having Sprint service on it pic.twitter.com/qC9w5Q1fpb — Tim Schofield (@qbking77) December 11, 2017 Tech-tuber, Tim Schofield, dug out a Palm Pre today to do a comparison video of the iPhone X and the original Palm Pre with equal parts “Apple finally copied webOS” and “this weird device is old, lolz” sprinkled in. Perhaps the video is in response to claims from Qualcomm that Apple went too far in their borrowing (read: theft) of elements that made webOS, well, webOS. He admits this isn’t a serious comparison, of course. New video tonight! Mixing it up a bit and just made this one for fun — Tim Schofield (@qbking77) December 11, 2017 I’m going to let the video speak for itself on this one. He had some help getting that Pre bypassed from our community, by the way (no shout-out in the video, Tim?!). And my favorite comment on the video has got to be this one! Yes. Yes, it does. #webOSforever Related posts: Qualcomm’s Palm Patents used in lawsuit against Apple over iPhone X ACL for webOS pre-release video appears Resurfaced HP Video Shows webOS Device Concepts View the full article
  11. Does webOS Quick Install look like this on your computer? Well, if you have a high resolution display (QHD+, 4k, etc.) on your Windows PC, there’s a fix for that. Over at superuser, someone having a similar issue posed the “how do I fix it” question because holy cow, that’s hard to read. I’d been struggling with it myself for about a year and never had much luck fixing it. This fix however, fixed not only my Java app issues (specific to webOS Quick Install and Nova Device Installer) but also fixed other apps that don’t scale well like 7zip (by making the change to the 7zip exe). Here’s the fix: Find java.exe and/or javaw.exe likely found in C:\Program Files\Java\jre(version#)\bin. Right click on it and select -> Properties Go to Compatibility tab Check Override high DPI scaling behavior. Choose System for Scaling performed by: Click OK Launch your java app and tada! #webOSforever Thanks to webOS friend, FastbootOEM for the tip! Related posts: TIP: preware.net solutions for WOSQI, Preware v1.9.13 View the full article
  12. Just like an older car, with any webOS device these days, you have to perform some maintenance to keep it running smoothly. And one of those maintenance items you have to do on your webOS device is cleaning out the “var” (variable data) partition. If your webOS device has any of the following symptoms, the trouble could be that your “var” partition is full, or nearly full: Unable to download files, or play streaming media. Can’t install or update webOS apps. Trouble downloading new e-mails. Generally sluggish, or very slow to respond to gestures. The “var” partition is an area of the disk used behind-the-scenes by the the webOS operating system. You don’t really notice it or interact with it on a day-to-day basis. This is a standard directory location on almost all Unix and Linux-based operating systems, which webOS of course, is. What usually goes here are files used internally by webOS during the course of its operation, such as log files, temporary and not-so-temporary database files, and other files that webOS needs to just keep track of what it’s doing from minute-to-minute. Now as you could guess, things like operating system log files could just get bigger and bigger over time, and without any user intervention, they could eventually take up the disk on a regular PC, or flash storage partition on a mobile device. There are already utilities built-in to webOS that automatically run once in a while to delete old log files to keep this from happening. Normally, on more recent desktop Linux operating systems, the var partition is just a part of the root partition, and can usually take up the whole hard drive. On our webOS devices, most (but not all) of our available storage is taken up by our media partition. When you have a TouchPad with 16GB of storage, only about 15GB is available for your own use, to store music, videos, photos, documents, and other files. The other 1GB or less is so that webOS itself can have some filespace for its own needs. Out of that less-than-1GB, only 62MB (megabytes) is set aside for the var partition. Yeah, that’s not a lot, but it’s just a consequence of trying to give as much storage is feasible to you for your own files on your webOS device. So besides the log files that webOS automatically trims once in a while there are other directories and files that webOS does not keep in check, that can grow over time and fill up the var partition. Over the years, different people have discovered that it is safe to remove files from the following directories: 1. Browser cache and cookies Your web browser has to save files somewhere, and you guessed it – they go in the var partition. 2. /var/luna/data/downloadhistory.db This file is just a listing of all of the different files that have been downloaded through your browser. On the TouchPad, you can clear this list using the browser. But on phones, you don’t have that option to clear this from the browser. 3. /var/minicores Files that go in here are stack traces of applications that have crashed. These are the kind of files that would have been useful to the folks developing webOS. 4. /var/context/pending This directory would contain files that would get uploaded to Palm periodically, to help them spot operating system errors on devices already released. The files also controversially contain things like location data. 5. /var/palm/data/localstorage – http*.localstorage Some websites use javascript features that create a little database on the users computer. Those database files go in this directory on webOS. Now, if your webOS device is in a state where you cannot even launch a new app because the var partition is full, you will have to use novaterm or a similar utility to access the command line of your webOS device, and delete files from the var partition manually. But if you have the Internalz file management app, and you can start it successfully, you can use that to navigate to each of these locations and take the following steps. 1. For browser cache and cookie files, open your webOS browser app, and access the Preferences from the menu. Press the buttons to Clear History, Clear Cookies and Clear Cache. Please note that clearing cookies will erase any passwords you may have saved for websites you might have to login to from the browser, such as Facebook or the webOSNation forums. You’ll just have to re-enter and re-save your login info the next time you visit those sites. 2. For /var/luna/data/downloadhistory.db, just navigate to this directory in Internalz and delete it there. The webOS browser will re-create it for you next time you start the browser. Even if this file is 1MB or so, remember that is 1MB out of 62MB total, so it will definitely help. 3. For /var/minicores, navigate to this directory in Internalz, and delete any and all files found there. You may not find any files here. If you don’t, no problem. 4. For /var/context/pending, navigate to this directory in Internalz, and delete any and all files found there. You may not find any files here. If you don’t, no problem. 5. For /var/palm/data/localstorage, you don’t want to delete all files here – only consider ones that start with “http”. Even those, maybe don’t delete files of websites that you visit a lot, or you may lose features saved by the website on your webOS device. There may be A LOT of files here, so here is a trick in Internalz: tap the “Size” column so that the largest files appear at the top. The display will go from this: …to this: Now you can easily delete the first few files beginning with “http” that will make the biggest impact in freeing up space for you. Keep deleting these files until you can’t stand it any more. Now that you have freed up that precious space in your var partition, there is one final thing you need to do, if you haven’t already done it: If you had a ton of files in /var/context/pending, this means you probably haven’t installed the “EOM Overlord Monitor” from Preware. This is a patch/application that will prevent the scripts that fill up this directory from running. These scripts or background apps also try to send these files to Palm servers that no longer exist, so it makes sense to turn off these features on your device. Just install the app from Preware, and it will care of turning those things off. With your routine maintenance complete, your classic model is ready for the road again! Discussion thread here. Related posts: Guide: How to Fix YouTube for webOS 2.x Guide: Pebble Smartwatches for webOS 2.x Guide: Saving Apps From The App Catalog Part 2: HP Takeout View the full article
  13. First, no this is not my auction nor do I or pivotCE know the seller in any way! This crazy deal is just too good NOT to tell you about. Every once in a while a Palm Foleo pops up on eBay with a price tag to match its rareness…usually around $1000 USD (or $2300 like the New in the Box one there right now)! But these? A paltry $179 and $11.65 in shipping (only to the USA though) and that’s the Buy It Now price. You can make an offer and possibly get one or both of them for less. For the PalmOS nostalgic, it doesn’t get any better than the Foleo. The auction has 27 days left at the time of this writing so they’re up there to sell. See the video below for an idea of what the Foleo could have done since it was never officially released. Hit the eBay listing! #PalmOSforever Related posts: HP is to Palm as Lenovo is to Motorola…Not Good TCL, Blackberry & Palm HP attempts to sell Palm patents – again. View the full article
  14. Do you speak Russian? Do you have have an LG webOS TV? Do you want to root it? For that tiny fraction of a percentage of you out there, do I have a video for you! We talked about root on LG webOS TVs a while back but the instructions were a bit…daunting, though not being a Russian speaker myself I can’t say if the video is much better. So, if someone wants to translate and overdub this in English for the community that’d be great! Also, if someone can please explain why you’d want root access on a TV, that would be good to know too. Talk about it! #webOSforever Related posts: It seems a webOS TV has been rooted. ACL for webOS pre-release video appears Resurfaced HP Video Shows webOS Device Concepts View the full article
  15. Bing Maps has been patched for their latest API change for webOS. webOS Nation forums user, Misj’, has developed two patches to cover both the Pre and TouchPad bases. Microsoft has switched over to v8 of the maps API and left our old v7 in the dust. Misj’ discovered the issue and wrote a simple patch to change the URL the app points to. Before and after on a Pre.It’s not 100% perfect since this change doesn’t fix a couple things: – Birds-eye view does not work any more and results in a blank screen. – Even though the locale is set to PalmSystem.locale, you may have to add your country to your search criteria to make sure you don’t get a random country result. Before and after on a TouchPad.There’s also a little bit of confusion about which patch to use since some have reported that the TouchPad version of the patch doesn’t work on all TouchPads. For some reason, some TouchPads have the Pre version of Bing Maps or so it would seem. Basically, if you try to install the TouchPad patch and it fails, try the Pre3 version and you should be fine. You can get the patches and talk about it in the post of the forum. Personally I use Google Maps by 72ka found in Preware which generally speaking works perfectly. But I’m always happy when a developer takes the time to restore functionality to webOS. Thanks Misj’! #webOSforever Related posts: The Tenth day of webOS-mas – Tweaks. All-clear for webOS devices with Google accounts TIP – YouTube Search/Quality fix for webOS 1.x/2.x View the full article


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