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    • By News Reporter
      In this episode of On the Job, we take a look at the pivotal role played by the LG’s unsung brand and packaging designers.

      In the consumer electronics industry, the term “design” usually conjures up images of gadgets and devices on a drawing board. Although the way a product looks is without a doubt a key factor to its popularity, so too are the way it’s packaged and branded. Done well, these two elements can go a long way toward creating a unique, instantly recognizable identity, one that resonates with consumers and communicates the core values of a product or lineup and the company that made them.
      At LG, the responsibilities of brand and package design fall on the visual identity (VI) team at LG Corporate Design Center. When designing a logo or package for a new model or product range, the VI team considers a range of factors such as consumers’ needs, legibility and usability, never losing sight of their goal to establish a clear identity that creates a good first impression but also an instant understanding of what the brand stands for.

      A distinctive logo is at the heart of any good brand’s visual identity. LG’s VI team develops a symbol that embodies the essence of every product and effectively communicates their differentiated values. LG SIGNATURE, LG PuriCare, LG CordZero, LG OLED TV and LG UltraGear are just a handful of the globally recognized logos the team has created to date.
      Able to enhance a product’s appeal and reinforce its overall aesthetic, packaging design gives the VI team another way to express the identity of each LG brand, in addition to affording adequate protection for the company’s diverse offerings.

      LG UltraGearTM gaming monitors have made a name for themselves among serious gamers worldwide by providing great picture quality and performance. Seeking to match the monitors’ strong reputation with an equally dynamic symbol, LG introduced a new UltraGear logo in 2020.  In order to convey that LG UltraGear is a key “weapon in the quest for gaming victory and glory,” the VI team set about researching the legendary weapons of mythical heroes and gods, such as the shield of Isis, King Arthur’s Excalibur, and the Harpe of Perseus. The team ultimately drew inspiration from the famous Greek sculpture known as the Winged Victory of Samothrace – also known as the Nike of Samothrace – representing action and triumph.

      The winged motif seemed like the perfect choice for the UltraGear emblem due to the prevalence and significance of wings throughout gaming history. Wings symbolize many things: aerial superiority over opponents, fast travel to new destinations, tactical advantage by surveying from above. The final version of the logo depicts Nike’s wings in the form of a stylized U and G in two versions, one flat and the other in 3D.

      From left: Seo Young-seok, Jun A-reum, Nam A-ran
      “Creating and developing LG UltraGear’s emblem was a meaningful and rewarding process,” stated Seo Young-seok of LG’s VI team. “We feel that it successfully expresses the identity of our premium gaming monitor brand and how seriously LG takes the needs of the gaming community.”

      To increase consumer awareness and raise the profile of the new emblem at launch, LG hosted an art contest to involve fans in the creative process because there is nothing more powerful than visually communicating the value of a product through great design to grab the attention of consumers in a crowded market.
      # # #

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    • By [email protected]
      In LG TV OLED55C9 we are not able to get Sonyliv app... we cant download or we cant use this app ... 
       
      sony was not able to develop the app for lg webos from last 2018 year they have been telling very soon and later they told by 1st quarter of 2020 it will be ready but still not ready... 
    • By News Reporter
      In the Korea press, readers will often run across the term MZ Generation. No, this isn’t a new K-Pop group but a forced pairing of two groups – Millennials and Gen Z – which the rest of the world views as separate and distinct demographic cohorts. Separating consumers into different generations is useful for researchers and social scientists, who measure and document differences in attitudes and behaviors.
      Similar to how the term untact marketing was coined in South Korea to refer to connecting with consumers intimately but in a safer, more convenient and era-appropriate manner, MZ Generation is meant to more effectively describe the new consumer target that has quickly become the focus of many brands. Millennials (born 1981-1996) and Gen Z (born 1997-2012) cohorts may be distinctly separate in age but there are many similarities in the two groups as well, and this is the point that Koreans seem to find more compelling. After all, according to the Pew Research Center, “generational cutoff points aren’t an exact science.”

      Photo Credit:
      What makes Millennials and Z Gen similar – and what Koreans find more relevant, it seems – are that both demographics are digitally fluent, come from diverse backgrounds, care about social justice and climate change, and tend to be more educated than previous generations. When entering adulthood, both have been impacted by economic downturns and uncertainty, such as the 2008 financial crisis and the current COVID-19 pandemic. On a deeper level, MZ share common characteristics in their relationship with brands – it’s all about transparency and authenticity. Both want brands to mirror their values and dynamically cater to their preferences. Such values and preferences can range from beauty/fashion brands featuring ‘real’ women of various colors/shapes/sizes in their campaigns (i.e. ), to food/beverage brands becoming more health-centric/using natural ingredients (i.e. ), to automotive brands making conscious efforts towards conserving the environment via expansion into renewable energy (i.e. ), and so on. Note that all of the reference brands are some of MZ’s favorites.

      Photo Credit:
      Where does this obsession with transparency and authenticity come from? It’s fair to assume that such values developed in the post-modern, digital world – as MZers have increasingly grown up with social media, often facing challenges of maintaining their online personas and real-world-selves, as well as discovering truths in seas of misinformation/fake news, they are in constant pursuit of discovering authentic and transparent initiatives.
      If a brand promotes a CSR initiative in a developing country, MZ want to know about it. A brand pledges to become carbon neutral by 2025? They want to know about that as well. MZers are attracted to activities that reflect their values, especially in the context of the brands’ missions – a quality uniquely distinct from any prior generation.

      Photo Credit:
      MZ also strive to become the best versions of themselves, expecting brands to play an active role in that journey. Whether by helping them live more sustainably by providing reusable packaging with their foods/beverages, or educating them on how to participate in social justice campaigns by providing resources on how to donate to particular causes, or building platforms via social media channels where MZ can have a voice and make creative contributions. Through such intentional initiatives, supporting MZ in terms of their self-improvement and yet providing them autonomy, brands can become the young generation’s ally and work together to make life truly good.

      In that vein, LG has launched the MZ Project aimed at handing the content and creative power over to the young generation, thereby empowering them to craft their own stories and personal brands – be it through music or film. As LG “encourages their diverse and limitless possibilities,” MZ is encouraged to continue their creative and positive contributions to the world, especially in times of such incredible uncertainty.

      At the cusp of major milestones in life, MZers are still exploring and learning to understand the complicated nuances of the world – and to have a brand helping them engage with their peers/inspirations, as well as get closer to achieving their dreams, makes their lives a bit easier to navigate. And that’s exactly what LG wants to communicate to MZ – that no matter what they do and where they are, LG is there to support their creative endeavors and ensure that ultimately… Life’s Good.

      By Jamie Waltzer, LG Brand Strategy Task
      # # #

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    • By Pramod Bisen
      Hi Team
      By when we can expect Sony LIV app and MX Player availability in LG Smart TV web OS version 5.80.35.
       
      Please reply
    • By Kenny Assunção
      I have a LG smartg and in the place where you have LG content store is only the "Premium" that is different from the store because I could not install any program. I have seen a smartv like this but had LG content store but this one has not, I would like to know why this and if there is any solution to solve this. thank you






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